Home » Math » How to Teach Division of Whole Numbers Leading to Answers with Fractions

 

It really surprised me. They were completely baffled, The problem had seemed simple, but the looks i was getting let me know I was wrong. It really wasn’t as easy as I had thought.

There are 4 rabbits, but you only have 3 carrots. How can you feed each of them the same amount of carrots?

Seeing their confused faces, and lack of knowing where to start…. I knew some intervention was needed. A little, hands-on interactive notebook type intervention.

 

Interactive Notebook for Division of Whole Numbers Leading to Answers with Fractions

I created four-word problems involving food. Children relate to feeding themselves, and I’m sure they have figured out in the past how to share something when there wasn’t enough. If you want to start even more hands on, you could provide the actual cookies and let them figure out the first problem with real food.

 

Before you start!

However you decide to do it, here are a few things you will want to remind your kiddos before you start.

  • When you divide, your answer must be in equal parts.
  • The dividend, or what is being divided up, is ALWAYS the first number in a division expression or equation. This will throw them if this is the first time seeing this. We are most comfortable seeing the first number of the expression as the larger number, not the smaller number.

Yes, you could simply teach them that the dividend becomes the numerator and the divisor becomes the denominator. What have you really taught them? Do they understand why this happens? A month down the road are they going to remember what to do when there are more rabbits than carrots? Probably not.

*This post contains affiliate links. Many are from Amazon.com.

What you need

  1. glue
  2. scissors
  3. math journal or construction paper

How to Teach

Simply work through the problems with the kiddos on the free download.

1. Start by creating an expression with the pictures. I have to divide up two hot dogs. That is my dividend, so I will glue on two hotdogs and write the number two on the first line of my expression.

2. Three people want a hotdog. That is my divisor, so I will glue on three people next and write the number 3 on the second line of my expression.

Now I have 2 ÷ 3.

FullSizeRender (2)

3. Now, the students will fold on the dotted line and solve underneath. Have the students place three people on the paper. I will place my three people on, and then put under them the correct amount of food. For this problem, I need to cut each

4. Next, they will have to cut the hotdogs up so that everyone will get the same amount. The best way to do this is to cut each hot dog up into three parts because there are three people. Write on the hotdog what fractional part each hot dog piece represents and then glue them under the people.

5. Add up all the pieces under one person, and you have an answer.

The Algorithm for Division of Whole Numbers Leading to Answers with Fractions

At this point, I would highly recommend using the algorithm. If you have talked about changing remainders into decimals, then the students will quickly see how this works.

If you haven’t, this video is an awesome place to start.

Now all you have to do is repeat these steps three more times, and you will be on your way to knocking out those baffled looks when there are more rabbits than carrots.

You’ve Got This

You may also like…

 

Need an assessment? This 10 question assessment will get your children thinking about modeling division and solving word problems. Get it at my TpT store.

 

 

Get your freebie HERE.

 

 

 

 

Like what you see. Keep up to date with one or more of the following……

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 thoughts on “How to Teach Division of Whole Numbers Leading to Answers with Fractions

  1. swapna says:

    Very interesting! Pinning to the practical mondays board

    (PS: are u on twitter?)

  2. swapna says:

    Very interesting! Pinning to the practical mondays board

    (PS: are u on twitter?)

  3. swapna says:

    Very interesting! Pinning to the practical mondays board

    (PS: are u on twitter?)

Comments are closed.