Home » Math » FREE Visual Worksheet For Multiplying Decimals by Whole Numbers

This multiplying decimals by whole numbers worksheet have children coloring in decimal grids and working on the number line to solve word problems.

This multiplying decimals by whole numbers worksheet have children coloring in decimal grids and working on the number line to solve word problems.

Word problems were hated and despised when I grew up! Those nasty word problems would pop up at the end of a long page of problems, and just provided more work for me when I was ready to be DONE.

I didn’t understand one very important thing. Word problems are real life. When I do math nowadays, it is in all practicality a word problem. And many of my “word problem” involve decimals.

What is a better deal….buy three at $1.25 or five at $0.99. How much do we save on this plan vs that plan? Which is a better value…..the 7 oz jar of the 20 oz jar?

So today, we will be tackling word problems that involve multiplying decimals by whole numbers. And it won’t be like those icky word problems at the end of a page. Today we get to color and do a little number line jumping to solve.

Prep-Work

Don’t you love no-prep printables? Well, that is exactly what these are!

  1. First, print of the pages.
  2. Then all you have to do is provide crayons and pencils

That’s it!

Multiplying Decimals by Whole Numbers

So how do we use these sheets to solve? I’m glad you asked!

Estimate:

The first step is to estimate. And there are numerous ways you can get children to do this, but here are two examples.

If your children are familiar with multiplying fractions by whole numbers, this is a great place to start. I know that that .12 is very close to one-tenth which can also be written as 1/10. I know I need to multiply by 4 so 1/10 x 4 = 4/10 or .4. If they aren’t comfortable with that, then have them simply add up .1 four times. That also equals .4!!!

Decimal Grids

Now it is time to color!!!

A decimal grid is divided up into 100 squares and therefore makes it easy to represent decimals. In this word problem, our decimal is .12.

This means that we have one-tenth and two-hundredths. If you look carefully at the decimal grid, you will notice that there are ten columns. This means each column is 1 out of the 10 that you need to make a whole decimal grid. In other words, each column is 1/10 or .10 or .1!!! Two-hundredths is shown by coloring in two out of the hundred squares.

To solve this problem we color in .12 four times. As you can see in the sample above .12 is colored in four times with each .12 being in a different color. I like to color all my hundredths on the same column since it makes it easier to figure out the total. The second column has all my hundredths. There are two-hundredths in orange, two-hundredths in purple, two-hundredths in green, and two-hundredths in blue.

In all, four-tenths (.4) have been colored in and eight-hundredths (.08) have been colored in so my answer is .48.

Another Decimal Grid Example:

This decimal grid example has us multiplying 1.34 x 3.

I began by grabbing three crayons, knowing that I was going to have to color in 1.34 three times. Orange was my first choice and I colored in the first decimal grid completely, because one decimal grid equals one whole. Next, I went to my second decimal grid and began to color in thirty-four hundredths.

I began by coloring in three tenths, which is three columns. Next, I colored in four hundredths, which is four squares.

I did this two more times, using my purple and green crayon. Once again, I combined all the extras in one box (box 2) to make it easier to find a total at the end. And as you can see my total is four wholes and two hundreths. This means that I don’t have any tenths and I must put a 0 in the tenths spot when I write the number out.

4.02

Number Line

Next, we come to the number line part. This part is to remind children that multiplication is actually repeated addition. It helps them see that all we are doing is adding decimals over and over.

We begin at 0, and then make our first of four jumps. Each jump will be .12 because we are multiplying that number four time.

0. + .12 = .12

.12 + .12 = .24

.24 + .12 = .36

.36 + .12 = .48

Just as with my decimal grids, I get .48!!

Learning to multiply decimals is important and this is a great way to show children what is happening when the multiply.

I hope you see some light bulbs go off and they color and jump away!

You’ve Got This,

Rachel

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