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This fun money game gets little ones to practice coin recognition and coin values as they race to be the first to get to 100.

This fun money game gets little ones to practice coin recognition and coin values as they race to be the first to get to 100.

My first grader has hit the money section in his math book!! I’m excited about this unit as it is hands-on, and so practical. And to celebrate, I created a special game for him and I can’t wait to share this fun money game with you.

Before the game:

We began by creating a chart with each of the coins in it. The glued in a picture of the coin and then we drew pictures of what was on each coin, and of course, we wrote down what each coin was worth.

We also played a game by  The Measured Mom as it reinforced coin recognition.

And if you need more, these posts also have great coin recognition activities.

  1. Printable Books about Coins
  2. Numerous Money activities like interactive notebooks and worksheets

Game Time: Prep-Work

This game is simple to get going.

  1. First, print off the 100’s chart on card stock paper. Print off the cards with coins on it, or the page that has a die you can create on your own.
  2. Next, Stick the cards in a learning cube, or fold the blue tabs to make a die.
  3. Finally, gather up game pieces and you are ready to go.

How to Play this Fun Money Game

The purpose of this fun money game is to get children recognizing coins and their value……and as an added benefit they get to build number sense using the hundreds chart.

  1. Children take turns rolling the die.
  2. The child should say the name of the coin they rolled and its value.
  3. Then our little ones get to move up that many spaces on the hundreds chart.
  4. The first person that gets to the end of the chart wins!

Carson-Dellosa Publishing Differentiated Instruction CubesCarson-Dellosa Publishing Differentiated Instruction CubesHonbay 80pcs Multi-Color Plastic Pawns Pieces for Board Games, Tabletop Markers ComponentHonbay 80pcs Multi-Color Plastic Pawns Pieces for Board Games, Tabletop Markers ComponentNeenah Bright White Cardstock, 8.5”x11”, 65lb/176 gsm, Bright White, 75 Sheets (90905)Neenah Bright White Cardstock, 8.5”x11”, 65lb/176 gsm, Bright White, 75 Sheets (90905)

 

Teaching during the Game

When we began playing this game my first grader had already spent a lot of time on the hundreds chart…..so this game was just a way for him to make connections between money and the hundreds chart.

When he rolled a penny it was easy, because he knew he was moving up one space. When he rolled a dime, I watched as he tediously counted up 10 spaces.

I didn’t say anything but was thrilled when I rolled a dime. I began my thinking aloud, I do this a lot of that with my children and I did it with my students when I taught in a public school setting. There is so much that we think about, or used to think about when we solve problems. Our students need to hear our thoughts and hear how we are processing each step as we work through a problem. The clearer we are when we explain our thinking, the quicker they will understand what to do, and be able to explain their thinking. (Ok, soapbox over!!)

My thinking out loud sounded something like this.

“HMMMM, I know that 10 + 10 = 20. Wow look, 10 is right under 20 on the numbers chart. ….And when you moved 10 spaces you started at 27 and end at 37. Look they both end in 7 and 37 is under 27. I wonder if 15 +10 = 25. What do you think?”

My first grader with his quest for all things numbers jumped in and began moving my game piece. He carefully counted to 10 again and in astonishment said, “Mom, you were right. That is an easy way to add 10!!”  That was it. He never counted 10 spaces again. He just moved that game piece down.

* Please remember that all children are different. My first grader picks math up quickly. What only took one explanation for him, probably would have taken numerous for my kindergartner. And that is fine. All of our little ones, grow, learn, and develop very differently.*

Overall, we had a blast playing the game. When it came time for us to just pull the coins out and make a certain amount, the little boy surprised me once again with how quickly he had caught on. In fact, he kept begging for them to be harder!!

You’ve Got This,

Rachel

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Coin value and recognition mystery box!

Money Game

 

 

 

13 thoughts on “FREE Fun Money Game to Practice Coin Recognition and Coin Values

  1. Mother of 3 says:

    OH I just love this game idea! My youngest son can count on with the coins no problem but he still has difficulty remembering which coin is which! This should be a fun way to practice and so simple.

    1. Rachel says:

      Thank you!! Enjoy!!!

  2. Mother of 3 says:

    OH I just love this game idea! My youngest son can count on with the coins no problem but he still has difficulty remembering which coin is which! This should be a fun way to practice and so simple.

  3. Mother of 3 says:

    OH I just love this game idea! My youngest son can count on with the coins no problem but he still has difficulty remembering which coin is which! This should be a fun way to practice and so simple.

    1. Rachel says:

      Thank you!! Enjoy!!!

  4. Oh this is great! Definitely playing this with my son today! Thanks!

  5. Oh this is great! Definitely playing this with my son today! Thanks!

    1. Rachel says:

      I’m so glad you have found something useful! Enjoy!

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