This adding and subtracting movement game will get children adding, subtracting, creating and solving expressions. It also helps get their wiggles out.

*This post contains affiliate links from Amazon and other bloggers. There is no additional cost but if you choose to purchase, I receive a small percentage that helps pay for the upkeep of You’ve Got This and feeds my family!

Don’t know how it is where you are living, but it has gotten cold here. We love being outside, and we try to make that a part of our day as long as the weather permits. When the high is 33 and the wind is whipping around you, I often find myself passing on that particular routine.

When I find myself skipping our daily dose of vitamin D, there will be some point during the day that the energy will come out. With three rambunctious little boys, there will be a game of tag, wrestling, or whatever else their creative minds can come up with filling my home. While I’m normally fine with that, I decided to create a game that would allow them to get some energy out in an organized way.

How This Adding and Subtracting Movement Game Worked For Us

On a particularly cold afternoon, we pulled out Wiggle to 100 – an adding and subtracting movement game. My kiddos love games, so even if there is some “learning” happening, they really don’t care. They excitedly separated the pieces and were ready to get started.

We first talked about expressions. I explained they were a lot like equations, but they don’t have an answer. I asked them to draw two number cards and one operation sign card. I then had them create their expression.

Expressions

As we all know, making an adding expression is easy. Subtraction though, you have to have the larger number first. Well you have to do that if you want to have a positive number and my kindergarten student is not quite ready for negative numbers. I expected to have to discuss this as they made the equations, and I was right. It came about a little different than I thought. With my four-year-old, I just corrected it and said, “Remember the larger number needs to come first.” He would point out the largest number and we would fix it.

My 5-year-old, would actually say it correctly every single time, but his expression would not match what he was saying. I never had to explain to him why the larger number goes first, he instinctively did it. What we did have to go over is that we read expressions the same way we read a book, from left to right. I always love the surprises that come when teaching. You just never know where there are gaps and misunderstanding.

The next step was to solve the expression. My kindergartener was pretty much able to do this on his own. I loved the fact that when he couldn’t do it in his head, he was using our game board, the hundreds chart, to help him solve his expression.

If you are playing with little ones, I would highly recommend having some type of manipulatives with you. I used my fingers to help my four-year-old, solve his expressions. Thinking back on it, he would have done great with math link cubes,  plastic counting bears, counting rods, etc so he could do it on his own.

And the Fun Part

Now came the fun part!!! We drew a white card (this had our actions on it). Whatever was the solution to their expression was how many times they had to do the action. The kindergartner got running around our kitchen, and with a laugh, he took of running. Little four year old had to kick and touch his toes. I love how is tongue is out while he tries to do the action.

IMG_2028

Here is another one from a little later in the game. My Kindergartner is jumping up to try to touch the ceiling and then coming down to touch the floor. the four-year-old got another kicking one and is touching opposite toes. I added some crossing the middle line activities as this is great for their brains.

FullSizeRender

 

After getting a few wiggles out, the final step is to move up on the hundreds chart. If you were able to complete your challenge, then you get to move up on the hundreds chart based on the solution to your expression.

Prep – Work for Wiggle to 100

  1. First, print of the hundreds chart and movement cards. I recommend using card stock as it lasts longer.
  2. Next, print off the number cards on colored paper, and print off the operation sign cards on a different colored paper.
  3. Cut out the numbers, operation cards, and movement cards.
  4. Finally, gather up game piece.

Directions

  1. First, sort out the game cards into three piles.
  2. Allow both players to pick up two number cards and one operations card.
  3. Have the children create an expression.
  4. Next, the children solve the expression.
  5. When they have correctly solved the expression, they draw a movement card. They then do what the card says using the answer the just found to guide them in how many they should do.
  6. If they complete their exercise they may move up the hundreds board based on the answer to their expressions.
  7. The first person to 100 wins.

The boys fully enjoyed this, and as soon as we were done asked to play it again.

Of course, we will!! I can’t say no to this adding and subtracting movement game that works on expressions, adding and subtracting, hundreds chart, and burning off some energy!!

You’ve Got This

You may also like:

 

Get your free printable here.

 

 

 

One thought on “Grab a Free Adding and Subtracting Movement Game – Wiggle to 100

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: